/ViaCyte to Present at IDF World Diabetes Congress 2015/
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6:00 am Tuesday, November 17, 2015

ViaCyte to Present at IDF World Diabetes Congress 2015

SAN DIEGO, November 17, 2015 — ViaCyte, Inc., a privately-held regenerative medicine company with the first pluripotent stem cell-derived islet replacement therapy for the treatment of diabetes in clinical-stage development, today announced a company presentation at the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) World Diabetes Congress 2015, which will take place in Vancouver, Canada, November 30 to December 4, 2015.

Details of the presentation are as follows:

Title:                Preclinical and Clinical Testing of VC-01™ Product Candidate: Stem Cell-Derived, Macroencapsulated Islet Cell Replacement for Type 1 Diabetes
Speaker:          Dr. Kevin D’Amour, Vice President, Research, and Chief Scientific Officer
Date/Time:     December 2, 2:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. PST
Location:         Room 119, Vancouver Convention Centre, Vancouver, BC Canada
Session:           Islet transplantation vs. embryonic stem cells: Where does the future lie?

ViaCyte’s VC-01™ product candidate, a first-in-class cell replacement therapy for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, is currently being evaluated in a Phase 1/2 trial called STEP ONE, or Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of VC-01 Combination Product in Type One Diabetes.  The STEP ONE trial is currently evaluating safety in the first cohort of patients, who are receiving a sub-therapeutic dose.

For more information about ViaCyte’s participation in industry events, please visit: http://viacyte.com/news-events-2/viactye-events/

About ViaCyte:

ViaCyte is a privately-held regenerative medicine company focused on developing a novel cell replacement therapy for the treatment of diabetes.  ViaCyte is conducting a Phase 1/2 clinical trial of the Company’s lead VC-01 product candidate in patients with type 1 diabetes who have minimal to no insulin-producing beta cell function.  ViaCyte’s VC-01 combination product candidate is based on the production of pancreatic progenitor cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells.  These progenitor cells are implanted in a durable and retrievable encapsulation device.  Once implanted and matured, these cells are designed to secrete insulin and other regulatory factors in response to blood glucose levels.  The VC-01 product candidate is being developed as a potential long-term diabetes treatment with the goals of no immune suppression required, and a reduced risk of hypoglycemia and diabetes-related complications.

ViaCyte is headquartered in San Diego, California with additional operations in Athens, Georgia.  The Company is funded in part by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) and JDRF.

For more information please visit www.viacyte.com.  Connect with ViaCyte here: www.twitter.com/viacyte and www.facebook.com/viacyte.

8:00 am Monday, November 16, 2015

ViaCyte Licenses Cell Differentiation Technology to Takara Bio Inc.

SAN DIEGO, November 16, 2015 ViaCyte, Inc., a privately-held regenerative medicine company with the first pluripotent stem cell-derived islet replacement therapy for the treatment of diabetes in clinical-stage development, today announced that the Company has entered into a non-exclusive licensing agreement with Takara Bio, Inc.  Takara will utilize certain portions of ViaCyte’s cell differentiation technology to expand its stem cell product line, marketed under the Cellartis® brand.  Takara will make the technology available for research purposes only, not for clinical or commercial application.

The licensing agreement includes ViaCyte technology for a robust method of making definitive endoderm (DE) cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, a necessary step in the production of a number of cell types.  Takara will incorporate the technology into the kits it markets to researchers, including the Cellartis® iPS Cell to Hepatocyte Differentiation System.

“During our work to develop a stem cell-derived replacement cell therapy for type 1 diabetes, ViaCyte scientists successfully addressed a number of difficult problems in cell differentiation,” said Paul Laikind, Ph.D., president and CEO of ViaCyte.  “Licensing select aspects of our technology makes it more broadly available to the scientific community and should help to accelerate progress in the stem cell space across multiple therapeutic indications.”

About ViaCyte:

ViaCyte is a privately-held regenerative medicine company focused on developing a novel cell replacement therapy for the treatment of diabetes.  ViaCyte is conducting a Phase 1/2 clinical trial of the Company’s lead VC-01 product candidate in patients with type 1 diabetes who have minimal to no insulin-producing beta cell function.  ViaCyte’s VC-01 combination product candidate is based on the production of pancreatic progenitor cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells.  These progenitor cells are implanted in a durable and retrievable encapsulation device.  Once implanted and matured, these cells are designed to secrete insulin and other regulatory factors in response to blood glucose levels.  The VC-01 product candidate is being developed as a potential long-term diabetes treatment with the goals of no immune suppression required, and a reduced risk of hypoglycemia and diabetes-related complications.

ViaCyte is headquartered in San Diego, California with additional operations in Athens, Georgia.  The Company is funded in part by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) and JDRF.

For more information please visit www.viacyte.com.  Connect with ViaCyte here: www.twitter.com/viacyte and www.facebook.com/viacyte.

6:32 pm Monday, September 14, 2015

2015 San Diego JDRF Annual ONE Walk

Team ViaCyte Walked in the JDRF One Walk to Turn Type One Into Type None

2015 marks the eighth year Team ViaCyte has supported the JDRF One Walk by fundraising and participating in the San Diego event.  This year JDRF changed the event name from “Walk to Cure Diabetes” to “One Walk” to highlight their goal of creating a world without type 1 diabetes (T1D).

ViaCyte had 66 registered participants as walkers, virtual walkers, or donors on this year’s team.  At Balboa Park, where the walk took place, we had more than 35 walkers who came out to show their support on a beautiful fall day. We are also proud to announce we exceeded our fundraising goal of $12,000 and the fund continues to grow!

A diagnosis of T1D means there are no days off, and there is no cure. Each year, JDRF holds more than 200 walks across the country with more than 900,000 people who raise over $68 million for life-changing T1D research that focuses on development of treatments that reduce or eliminate the need for daily insulin injections.

The development and ongoing clinical trial of ViaCyte’s VC-01 has, in large part, been made possible by funding from JDRF.  The VC-01 product candidate is the first embryonic stem cell-derived islet replacement therapy to reach clinical testing and is currently being evaluated in patients with T1D who have minimal to no insulin-producing beta cell function. Clinical trials are happening in San Diego and Edmonton, Canada.

We are proud to participate in the JDRF One Walk every year and show our appreciation to JDRF and all the walk participants who make our research possible.  This year’s walk is over, but we are already preparing for next year and continue to support the efforts that will one day turn Type One into Type None.

Continue to donate to JDRF through the Team ViaCyte website.

Images from present and previous JDRF Walks

12:28 pm Monday, September 14, 2015

Fueling Innovation: ViaCyte’s Medical Biotechnology Career Showcase 2015

Investing in the Future

Here at ViaCyte, we believe in the importance of teaching and supporting our future generations in their scientific endeavors in order to fuel innovation.  With that, we were happy to host our first Medical Biotechnology Career Showcase where we provided high school students from around the San Diego region the opportunity to explore careers in regenerative medicine with the insights, knowledge, and guidance from the professionals at ViaCyte.

Students learned what it means to pursue a career in science by participating in discussions and demonstrations from a number of members of the ViaCyte team including execs, scientists, and engineers.

Lab 1: Stem Cells & Cell Culture – fed a mock flask of cells, and observed and imaged cultured cells using a microscope

Lab 2: Design Engineering – reviewed the medical device design process, from initial CAD to finished device and observed 3D printer in action

Lab 3: Medical Device Manufacturing –operated laser cutting materials, part inspection, and assembly of a mock device by ultrasonic welding

Lab 4: Product Manufacturing – performed a mock device filling operation in a barrier isolator

Lab 5: Histology & Imaging –observed stages of histological specimen preparation and performed inspection of stained tissue slides

A big thank you to all of the students who participated in making our first career showcase a great success!

10:19 am Monday, August 10, 2015

MIT Technology Review: A Pancreas in a Capsule

The MIT Technology Review published a piece expressing optimism about our “cells in a sack” approach to treating type 1 diabetes.  ViaCyte is mentioned as only the third company in the United States to test an embryonic stem cell-based therapy in humans.

As the article describes, in October 2014 we began a Phase 1/2 clinical trial to test the safety and efficacy of our VC-01™ candidate product — a semi-permeable pouch containing pancreatic precursor cells that are designed to differentiate upon implant to produce blood sugar-regulating hormones.  In this way, the VC-01 product could essentially act as a replacement endocrine pancreas.

This piece also emphasizes the seriousness of type 1 diabetes and how difficult it is for children — patients are required to prick their fingers, inject themselves with insulin, and monitor what they eat every day in order to regulate their blood sugar.  Improperly managed blood sugar can lead to kidney damage and blindness.

Read more in MIT Technology Review